“I Need To Sell My House Fast In Grosse Ile Michigan!”

We Buy Houses In Any Price Range Or Location In The Grosse Ile Michigan Area
See How Our Process Works And Let Us Make You A Fast, Fair Offer.

If you need to sell your house fast in Grosse Ile Michigan and surrounding areas… we’d like to make you a fair all-cash offer.

We buy houses in any condition… as-is… let us take over the burden of that unwanted property.

There are lots of situations where we can help, including… avoiding foreclosure, divorce, relocating, inherited an unwanted property, own a vacant house, upside down in your mortgage, behind on payments, owe liens, downsized and can’t sell your house, needs repairs you can’t pay for, fire damaged, bad rental tenants, and more.

Basically, if you have a property and need to sell it… we’d like to make you a fair cash offer and close on it when you’re ready.

Do You Need To Sell Your House in Grosse Ile Michigan?

We can buy your Grosse Ile Michigan house. Contact us today!
We can buy your Grosse Ile Michigan house. Contact us today!
You’ve tried to sell your house but are running into roadblocks.  You probably even tried calling a real estate agent. Sometimes selling a house the traditional way with a real estate agent is simply not the best for everyone.  As you know, there can be lots of pitfalls when selling a house the agent route, including: having to clean up and repair the property so it shows well, finding an agent who you trust and who can deliver on their promise (selling your house quickly), signing a contract that binds you to an agent for a certain term, the piles of paperwork you have to sign, shuffling paperwork back and forth from buyer –> to agent –> to you… and back.

The biggest issue with trying to sell with a real estate agent or selling it yourself is often times retail buyers will tie up a home for weeks and pull out on the deal at the last second… or have their bank loan fall through.

It can all add stress, months to the process, and in the end after paying the agent fees, you may or may not be ahead of the game.

We at We Buy Houses Grosse Ile Michigan work differently.  We will provide you a fair all-cash offer on your house within 24 hours of submitting the short property info form below and can close when you want to closeIf the house is in terrible shape and you don’t want to (or can’t) fix it up… NO problem, we’ll deal with it for you.  If you need to get something done quickly, we can close in as little as 7 days because we buy houses with cash and don’t have to rely on traditional bank financing. (Go here to learn about our process <<)

In short…

 No matter the condition of your house – your situation – or timeframe… 

Our goal is to help make your life easier and to get out from under that property that’s

stressing you out… while still paying a fast, fair, and honest price for your house.

Sell Your House Now - Please Submit Your Property Info Below

... to receive a fair all cash offer and to download our free guide.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Or Give Us A Call Now At: (313) 442-7022

About Grosse Ile Michigan

Grosse Ile Township is a general law township of Wayne County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The township is situated on several islands in the Detroit River, but the largest island is also referred to as simply Grosse Ile. The name comes from the French Grosse Île, meaning “Fat Island”. The population was 10,371 at the 2010 census.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 18.3 square miles (47 km2), of which 9.6 square miles (25 km2) is land and 8.7 square miles (23 km2), or 47.4%, is water.

Grosse Ile is the largest island on the Detroit River. The township of Grosse Ile is actually composed of twelve islands, although the community is most often identified with the main island (which residents simply refer to as “The Island”). Grosse Ile’s main island is technically composed of two islands.

The tip of the main island’s northern section is named Hennepen Point in honor of the 17th century French explorer Father Louis Hennepin. It is uninhabited and separated from the remainder of the northern section by an unnamed canal that cannot be navigated in a power boat.

The southern section of the main island is separated from the northern section by the Thorofare Canal, which runs on a diagonal course from east to west connecting the main channel of the Detroit River with the Trenton Channel of the river. The southern section of the main island is connected by bridges to Elba Island, Meso Island (also known as Upper Hickory Island), Hickory Island, and Swan Island, which are all inhabited.

Not far from the shoreline of the main island in the river lie Calf Island, Celeron Island (charted as Tawas Island), Dynamite (also known as Powder House Island), Fox Island, Stony Island, and Sugar Island, which are all uninhabited. Stony and Celeron are owned by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Calf Island is owned by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a part of the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge. The other islands are privately owned. Mamajuda Island lies off the northeastern tip of Grosse Ile and only appears during times of low water level.

Two bridges connect the main island to the mainland of Michigan. The bridge on the north end of the island is called the Grosse Ile Toll Bridge (off-white color). The bridge on the south end of the island is officially named the Wayne County Bridge (light green in color), but is commonly called the “Free Bridge” by locals.

Grosse Ile historians consider the beginning of ownership and governance of the community by residents of European heritage to have begun on July 6, 1776, when the PotawatomiIndians deeded the island to prominent Detroit merchants, brothers William and Alexander Macomb. Although the Potawatomi Indians, like most Native Americans, did not believe in the European legal concept of land ownership, they did consider the island to be part of their ancestral lands. The Potawatomi Indians called the island Kitcheminishen.

Historians assume that the Macomb brothers believed that by purchasing this deed through the transfer of items of value, they had in fact obtained full ownership rights. In any case, the Macomb brothers are considered to be the founders, and first legal owners, of Grosse Ile, because the Potawatomis, and later the United States government, respected the Macombs’ perceived rights to take possession of the island.

Today, recognition of the Macomb brothers’ historical importance is found in numerous places in the community. The central business district of Grosse Ile is located along Macomb Street which was named in their honor. A monument commemorating the day that the tribal chiefs and elders signed the deed to the Macomb brothers is located near the shoreline of the Detroit River at the foot of Gray’s Drive. The original deed, which was written on parchment, is stored in the Burton Historical Collection within the Detroit Public Library.

There are at least three homes still standing on the island that were built during the 19th century by a descendant or relative of the Macomb brothers. The Rucker Homestead, the oldest structure in use on Grosse Ile, 21319 West River Road: Portions of this home date to 1816; the front structure was added by John Anthony Rucker in 1835. ( Grosse Ile: A Historical Timeline) The Rucker-Stanton House on West River Road was built in 1848 by the great-grandson of William Macomb. The Wendell House on East River Road was built in the late 1860s by the John Wendell who married the granddaughter of William Macomb.

Westcroft Gardens, a Michigan Centennial Farm located on West River Road, is operated to this day by descendants of the Macombs. Westcroft, which is open to the public, features a nursery well known for growing and selling hybrid azaleas and rhododendrons. During the Halloween season they have haunted hay rides in the back of the farm called “Phantom Forest.” Westcroft is one of the oldest farms in Michigan still owned by the same family. Most of the original buildings at Westcroft Gardens are still standing to this day and well preserved.

The flags of three nations—France, England, and the United States—have flown over Grosse Ile since the first Europeans, French explorers, visited the island during the late 17th century. The early French explorers named the island as la grosse ile—the “big island” in French. The British, whose control of Michigan was established in 1763 after their victory in the French and Indian War, anglicized the spelling to “Grosse Isle”. This form was commonly used until early during the 20th century when local residents succeeded in an effort to re-establish the French version as the official name of the community. To the dismay of historic preservationists and long-time residents, it is still common for the uninformed to mispronounce the name of the community.

Catholic priest and missionary Father Louis Hennepin accompanied fellow French explorer René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle on the ship Le Griffon in exploring the Great Lakes in 1679. The Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church on Grosse Ile maintains that Father Hennepin came ashore and said mass at a location on the east shore of the island near the present site of St. Anne’s Chapel. While there apparently is not written proof of this specific event, Father Hennepin did write in his journals about the fruit orchards and wild animals on Grosse Ile, so historians assume that, at the very least, he explored the island first-hand. The north end of Grosse Ile is named Hennepin Point in his honor.

Grosse Ile played a minor role in the founding of the city of Detroit by the French explorer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac. Cadillac and his convoy of 25 canoes sailed down the Detroit River and camped on the shore of Grosse Ile during the evening of July 23, 1701. On the morning of July 24, Cadillac returned upriver and reached a spot on the shore near the present intersection of West Jefferson and Shelby streets in Detroit, where he claimed French possession of the territory under the authority of King Louis XIV.

Although Grosse Ile maintained its own name and identity as a community beginning in the 18th century, it did not obtain status as an independent unit of government until October 27, 1914, when the Wayne County Board of Supervisors agreed to separate the island from Monguagon Township. The first supervisor of Grosse Ile Township was Leonard H. Wilton.

Learn more about Grosse Ile here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grosse_Ile_Township,_Michigan

We Buy Houses Grosse Ile Michigan

We help property owners just like you, in all kinds of situations.  From divorce, foreclosure, death of a family member, burdensome rental property, and all kinds of other situations. We Buy Houses Grosse Ile Michigan and surrounding areas.  Sometimes, those who own property simply have lives that are too busy to take the time to do all of things that typically need to be done to prepare a house to sell on the market… if that describes you, just let us know about the property you’d like to be rid of and sell your house fast for cash.

If you prefer to talk to someone in our office before submitting your property information just give us a call today at (313) 442-7022

We Buy Houses in Grosse Ile Michigan, Michigan and all surrounding areas in Michigan. If you need to sell your house fast in Michigan, connect with us… we’d love to make you a fair no-obligation no-hassle offer. Take it or leave it. You’ve got nothing to lose. So call We Buy Houses Grosse Ile Michigan today!